Archive | September, 2005

Up in smokes

29 Sep

Usually I and the act of smoking do not get along very well. But for the past few days, as I suddenly realize, it is not very hard to find a smoke not too far from me. And it is not that I crave for it or anything like that, but with a cigarette ever so ubiquitous in the residence hall, plus surrounded by hard core smokers always keen on lighting up, you just can’t help it!!!
I ought to do something about it, though. Too much of passive smoking ain’t good.

Noodles Commercial to be shot in Space

26 Sep

From Boston News:

Ramen-noodles.deviantart.comThe makers of Japan’s favorite instant ramen noodles will soon be airing a commercial that’s truly out of this world.

Starting next month, Nissin Food Products Co. will film a promotional spot on the International Space Station for Cup Noodle, featuring a sales pitch by a hungry Russian cosmonaut.

The commercial will air in Japan in November as part of Nissin’s “Cup Noodle No Border” campaign, according to a statement Wednesday by Japan’s space program, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, or JAXA.

Space Films, a venture business set up by JAXA that specializes in space images, will send a high-definition camera to the space station aboard a Russian rocket launch Oct. 1 and direct the filming from Russia’s Mission Control Center outside Moscow, JAXA said.

Blogsurfing

26 Sep

Three (almost four now) straight all-nighters, with only a few hours of sleep thrown in between the days, and yet I am unable to sleep. If someone was really keen on looking out for ‘signs’, I wonder what would this count as?

But with assignments taking their toll on me and with my procratinatinating streak, in this supposedly “easy-going” semester, I couldn’t blame anybody. Perhaps what I need is a time capture device to store away this wasted time that I could release anytime later and put it to some good use, say sleeping.

The past week, the only thing that I had done remotely close to my academics was a Graphics assignment with OpenGL and stuff. And I was shocked to see a note from the Teaching Assistant which stated his inability to execute the ‘C’ Code. Apparently, I have to mail him the entire workspace, something that I find absolutely ridiculous. Just how difficult is it to set up a workspace and execute the code. To make things real bad, I have a sneaking suspicion that this might be evaluated with the dreaded “Late submission tag!”

And with another week starting, I can already see myself slaving away for the most part of it. Even before I begin most of the stuff, I am quite sure to fail the deadlines on almost half of them all. First on the priority list has to be the work that I am doing on the internationalization of a couple of web services with Websphere BI server and with my partner taking the GRE on the 30th of this month, it couldn’t have been worse. Then there’s a marketing analysis to be done. The list goes on, only I don’t feel that it is making any worthy weblog content at all. And so, this blog entry is closed here, officially.

Now, I will just aimlessly wander around the web clicking on the next blog button on Blogger, read some emails over and over again, only to think of all this tomorrow afternoon as useless procrastination and thinking that the time should have been rather spent sleeping.

[Update: Seeing the title of this post, I realize that I had intended to write something entirely different than what I have written here. Such is the wandering mind. ]

Still here?

26 Sep

I cant believe you are all still here. I have been way too busy the past week and now with things cooling off a bit, I surely will be blogging more regularly.For now, I need to catch some sleep…

Case Sensitive E-mail Addresses

21 Sep

Not often do I post two entries here in quick succession that completely stump me. The earlier one about Mozilla Browsers being more vulnerable than IE and now this whole thing about the email address being case sensitive.

New York Times says:

The domain-name portion of the e-mail address – the part after the @ sign – is not case -sensitive, but the first part of the address may need to be typed in exactly as given. This rule is explained in RFC 2821, the document laying out Internet e-mail standards, found at faqs.org/rfcs/rfc2821.html.

This certainly is news to me. I never had thought that my username was case sensitive. Apparently, in most cases they aren’t. The RFC2821 states:

The local-part of a mailbox MUST BE treated as case sensitive. Therefore, SMTP implementations MUST take care to preserve the case of mailbox local-parts. Mailbox domains are not case sensitive. In particular, for some hosts the user “smith” is different from the user “Smith”.

But then, I am not the only one who remains in this blissful state of ignorance. Hundreds of thousands of management aspirants who filled out the CAT application forms to India’s premiere B-schools just last month would have noted that the email address field had only uppercase options!

Mozilla browsers more vulnerable than IE

21 Sep

According to a Symantec Report, Mozilla Browsers are MORE vulnerable than Internet Explorer.

Well…

Professionalism Redefined for Software Engineers

20 Sep

[Redefining] software engineering professionalism with the following objectives:

  1. a professional programmer picks a worthwhile problem to attack; we are engineers, not scientists, and therefore should attempt solutions that will solve real user problems
  2. a professional programmer has a dedication to the end-user experience; most computer applications built these days are Web applications built by small teams and hence it is now possible for an individual programmer to ensure that end users aren’t confused or frustrated (in the case of a programmer working on a tool for other programmers, the goal is defined to be “dedication to ease of use by the recipient programmer”)
  3. a professional programmer does high quality work; we preserve the dedication to good system design, maintainability, and documentation, that constituted pride of craftsmanship
  4. a professional programmer innovates; information systems are not good enough, the users are entitled to better, and it is our job to build better systems
  5. a professional programmer teaches by example; open-source is the one true path for a professional software engineer
  6. a professional programmer teaches by documentation; writing is hard but the best software documentation has always been written by programmers who were willing to make an extra effort
  7. a professional programmer teaches face-to-face; we’ve not found a substitute for face-to-face interaction so a software engineering professional should teach fellow workers via code review, teach short overview lectures to large audiences, and help teach multi-week courses

http://philip.greenspun.com/ancient-history/professionalism-for-software-engineers